Partners

Consider taking a leadership role to help families and communities improve nutrition and cooking knowledge to make healthy food choices.

Many individuals, families and communities are at risk for chronic disease. There is an increase in obesity nationwide. Healthy eating, along with physical activity and tobacco reduction, can significantly reduce the risk of serious chronic diseases, like diabetes, cancer, cardiovascular disease and chronic respiratory disease. For example, when prevention methods are employed for diabetes, incidence of the disease is reduced by 25%; an annual savings of $200 million would result within 10 years in BC.

The importance of healthy eating and healthy weights for optimal growth and development of children and youth, for success in school, and for the prevention as well as management of chronic diseases, is well understood and supported by scientific evidence.

You can be part of the solution!

Consider sponsoring or funding Food Skills for Families programs for populations most at risk for chronic disease: Aboriginal, newcomer, Punjabi, seniors and low income families. Also, help to expand the program impact to new populations, such as new families (pregnancy outreach, early childhood development), youth, and people with mental health challenges.

The Food Skills for Families program was initially developed by Diabetes Canada as one of the five initiatives of the BC Healthy Living Alliance’s Healthy Eating Strategy, funded by ActNow BC.

Partners have included:

Program evaluation has revealed that Food Skills for Families fosters healthier eating behaviours. The curriculum is sufficiently flexible to meet different needs and target audiences. Capacity in BC communities has already been developed. This makes collaboration with Diabetes Canada’s Food Skills for Families program a winning strategy.

You can contribute to making BC a healthier place to live and work, and you will be recognized for your contribution.

For more information, contact us.

Supported by the Province of British Columbia and the Provincial Health Services Authority